Category Archives: Governance and landscape measures for control of water resource changes

Linking Strategic Environmental Assessment and monitoring of the Arctic

Juan Azcárate & Berit Balfors (Royal Institute of Technology) and Arvid Bring & Georgia Destouni (Stockholm University)

Azcárate et al. (2013) published an article entitled Strategic environmental Assessment and monitoring: Arctic key gaps and bridging pathways. Given rapid change in the Arctic region, environmental assessment and monitoring is needed in order to facilitate decision making which responds to changes and impacts on Arctic societies and ecosystems. In their article, implementation of Arctic-relevant Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) and monitoring is analysed and important implementation gaps are elucidated. Continue reading Linking Strategic Environmental Assessment and monitoring of the Arctic

The role of wetlands and other landscape features for large-scale nutrient retention

Andrew Quin, Fernando Jaramillo & Georgia Destouni, Stockholm University

Various ecosystems and other, physical features of a landscape contribute to a combined large-scale ecosystem service, attenuating the waterborne loading of nutrients and pollutants from various sources to downstream waters and ecosystems. Without this ecosystem service, nutrient and pollutant loading from the landscape would be greater and require more, and more costly, abatement measures to achieve the same level of water, environmental and ecosystem protection. This regulating ecosystem service is further closely linked to and may critically affect also other types of ecosystem services, such as the provisioning of clean water, the supporting of nutrient cycling and the cultural service of sustaining recreational water environments. The current values of the latter services depend all on the large-scale service of nutrient-pollutant regulation in the landscape.

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Drinking water scarcity in coastal areas – prediction and decision support tools

Robert Earon and Bo Olofsson, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH)

Aim of the project

The aim of this project is to improve understanding regarding groundwater in hard rock coastal regions. The study focuses on developing support tools for decision makers who are tasked with managing limited water supply resources in coastal regions and improving knowledge of the kinematic (effective) porosity values of hard rock. In hard rock terrains heterogeneity in the fracture network and geology limit the application of point-based hydrogeological tools. This study aims to develop methodologies which rely on continuous digital data (such as geological maps, topography, landuse) or simple field measurements of kinematic porosity which can complement existing data.
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